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   Mr. Anant Gaundalkar, the distinguished cricket statistician... (September 5, 1991)

Mr. Anant Gaundalkar, the distinguished cricket statistician, was telling me: "When Dilip Vengsarkar broke down the cried on the pitch, he was the 17th Indian cricketer to do so, which gives him the average of 6.022. In world figures, the average is slightly lower: 5.833."

"Interesting," I said.

The stastician continued: "This is only the second time in cricket history that a batsman wept and was incosolable though he did not lose his wicket and was in fact not out. The other time was in 1934, June 12, in a match between Essex and Sussex at Hove. On that occasion also, the batsman had remained not out and cried, but that was become had whether had stopped play and the game was declared as a draw when Sussex required only two runs to record an outright win."

"Very interesting," I said.

"The percentage a batsmen who have cried when a game has been lost by two runs is 36.011, and of bowlers having cried is 32.92. On only one occasion so far have both batsman and bowler wept together, that is when the Australia-West Indies Test was tied."

"Very, very interesting," I said.

The statistician said: "Cricketers have cried through history. On as average, a cricketer cries 12.76 times in his career, though not necessarily on the field of play, but always connected with cricket. The only cricketer who has never cried is off Boycott, but that is because he is a machine."

"Very, very, very interesting," I said.

"To go beyond cricket, to other sports in general, the player to head the percentage of weeping sportsmen is Diego Maradona: He cries whether he wins, loses, is sacked or is arrested. His percentage is cent per cent."

"Very, very, very, very interesting," I said.

"Cricketers for different reasons," the statistifician said. "The Australian captain Kim Hughes cried because the team lost under him and the Australian press blamed him for the defeat. The Indian wicketkeeper Kiran More cried because he was called all the way to Jaipur by the cricket board and not selected and not selected and then told to pay his own fare and hotel charges. The Indian board, on an average worked out over the last 20 years, makes 57.66 cricketers cry per cricket season."

"Very, very, very, very, very interesting," I said.

Mr. Gaundalkar said: "Vengsarkar's case will go down in cricket statistics as unique. So far, he is the only batsman to have cried on account of his partner being run out, though he himself had nothing to do with the run out as he had a substitute runner. I do not think that record will ever he broken, though you never can tell. That is the beauty of cricket statistics."

 
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